World BEYOND War: a global movement to end all wars

Tell Canada: #StopArmingSaudi

By Rachel Small, World BEYOND War, September 17, 2020

Today, September 17th 2020, marks the one year anniversary of Canada’s accession to the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT). While this should be cause for celebration of this landmark achievement, just last week Canada was condemned in the UN Group of Eminent International and Regional Experts for “helping to perpetuate the conflict” in Yemen through arms transfers to Saudi Arabia. When Canada signed the deal with Saudi Arabia to sell them light armoured vehicles (LAVs) in 2014 it was the largest arms deal in Canadian history. Saudi Arabia has used these LAVs to suppress peaceful protests and Canada’s continued export of these weapons casts doubt on Canada’s commitment to the ATT.

For this reason, World BEYOND War has joined a broad coalition across Canada including human rights activists, arms control advocates, labour groups, and feminist and humanitarian organizations to demand an immediate end to the transfer of light armoured vehicles and other weapons which risk being used in the perpetration of serious violations of international humanitarian or international human rights law in Saudi Arabia or in the context of the conflict in Yemen.

This morning we sent the following letter (below in English and then French) to Prime Minister Trudeau, and fellow ministers and opposition party leaders.

On September 21st, International Day of Peace, we invite you to join people across Canada in acting to #StopArmingSaudi through various in-person and online solidarity actions. Details here.   

The Right Honourable Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, P.C., M.P. Prime Minister of Canada
80 Wellington Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0A2

17 September 2020

Re: Ongoing Weapons Exports to Saudi Arabia

Dear Prime Minister Trudeau,

Today marks the one-year anniversary of Canada’s accession to the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT).

The undersigned, representing a cross-section of Canadian labour, arms controls, human rights, international security, and other civil society organizations, are writing to reiterate our continued opposition to your government’s issuance of arms exports permits to Saudi Arabia. We write today adding to the letters of March 2019, August 2019, and April 2020 in which several of our organizations raised concerns about the serious ethical, legal, human rights and humanitarian implications of Canada’s ongoing exports to Saudi Arabia. We regret that, to date, we have received no response to these concerns from you or the relevant Cabinet ministers on the matter.

In the same year that Canada acceded to the ATT, its arms exports to Saudi Arabia more than doubled, increasing from almost $1.3 billion in 2018, to almost $2.9 billion in 2019. Stunningly, arms exports to Saudi Arabia now account for over 75% of Canada’s non-US military exports.

Canada has indicated its intention to publish a white paper on a feminist foreign policy in 2020, to complement its existing feminist foreign assistance policy and its work to advance gender equality and the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Agenda. The Saudi arms deal sorely undermines these efforts and is fundamentally incompatible with a feminist foreign policy. Women and other vulnerable or minority groups are systemically oppressed in Saudi Arabia and are disproportionately impacted by the conflict in Yemen. Direct support of militarism and oppression, through the provision of arms, is the exact opposite of a feminist approach to foreign policy.

Further, the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs), which Canada endorsed in 2011, makes it clear that States should take steps to ensure that current policies, legislation, regulations, and enforcement measures are effective in addressing the risk of business involvement in gross human rights abuses and that action is taken to ensure that business enterprises operating in conflict affected areas identify, prevent and mitigate the human-rights risks of their activities and business relationships. The UNGPs urge States to pay particular attention to the potential risks of companies contributing to gender and sexual violence.

Finally, we recognize that the end of Canadian arms exports to Saudi Arabia will impact workers in the arms industry. We therefore urge the government to work with trade unions representing workers in the arms industry to develop a plan that secures the livelihoods of those who would be impacted by the suspension of arms exports to Saudi Arabia.

We are further disappointed that your government has not released any information with respect to the arms-length advisory panel of experts that was announced by Ministers Champagne and Morneau over five months ago. Despite multiple overtures to help shape this process – which could constitute a positive step towards improved compliance with the ATT – civil society organizations have remained outside of the process. We are similarly disappointed that there appear to be no further details about the Ministers’ announcement that Canada will spearhead multilateral discussions to strengthen compliance with the ATT towards the establishment of an international inspection regime.

Prime Minister, the decision to resume arms transfers in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic and only days after endorsing the UN Secretary-General’s call for a global ceasefire undermines Canada’s professed commitment to multilateralism and diplomacy. We again reiterate our call for Canada to exercise its sovereign authority and suspend the transfer of light armoured vehicles and other weapons which risk being used in the perpetration of serious violations of international humanitarian or international human rights law in Saudi Arabia or in the context of the conflict in Yemen.

Sincerely,

Amnesty International Canada (English branch)
Amnistie internationale Canada francophone
BC Government and Service Employees’ Union (BCGEU)
Canadian Friends Service Committee (Quakers)
Canadian Labour Congress
Canadian Union of Postal Workers
Canadian Union of Public Employees
Canadian Voice of Women for Peace
Canadians for Justice and Peace in the Middle East
Centre des femmes de Laval
Collectif Échec à la guerre
Comité de Solidarité/Trois-Rivières
CUPE Ontario
Fédération nationale des enseignantes et enseignants du Québec Food4Humanity
International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group
International Civil Society Action Network
Labour Against the Arms Trade
Les Artistes pour la Paix
Libyan Women Forum
Ligue des droits et libertés
MADRE
Médecins du Monde Canada
Nobel Women’s Initiative
Oxfam Canada
Oxfam-Québec
Peace Track Initiative
People for Peace London
Project Ploughshares
Public Service Alliance of Canada
Quebec Movement for Peace
Rideau Institute
Sisters Trust Canada
Soeurs Auxiliatrices du Québec
Solidarité populaire Estrie – Groupe de défense collective des droits
The Council of Canadians
Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom
Workers United Canada Council
World BEYOND War

cc: Hon. François-Philippe Champagne, Minister of Foreign Affairs
Hon. Mary Ng, Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade Hon. Chrystia Freeland, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance
Hon. Erin O’Toole, Leader of the Official Opposition
Yves-François Blanchet, Leader of the Bloc Québécois
Jagmeet Singh, Leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada
Elizabeth May, Parliamentary Leader of the Green Party of Canada
Michael Chong, Conservative Party of Canada Foreign Affairs Critic
Stéphane Bergeron, Bloc Québécois Foreign Affairs Critic
Jack Harris, New Democratic Party of Canada Foreign Affairs Critic
Sai Rajagopal, Green Party of Canada Foreign Affairs Critic

________________________________
________________________________

Le très honorable Premier Ministre Justin Trudeau, C.P., député. Premier ministre du Canada
80 rue Wellington
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0A2

17 septembre 2020

Objet: Reprise des exportations d’armes en Arabie saoudite

Monsieur le Premier Ministre Trudeau,

Nous soulignons aujourd’hui le premier anniversaire de l’adhésion du Canada au Traité sur le commerce des armes (TCA).

Nous soussignés, représentant un vaste éventail d’organisations syndicales, de contrôle des armes, de droits humains, de sécurité internationale et autres organisations de la société civile canadienne, vous écrivons pour réitérer notre opposition à l’octroi par votre gouvernement, de licences d’exportations d’armes à l’Arabie saoudite. Nous vous écrivons à nouveau aujourd’hui, faisant suite à nos lettres de mars 2019, d’août 2019, et d’avril 2020 dans lesquelles plusieurs de nos organisations s’inquiétaient des sérieuses implications, sur le plan éthique, légal, des droits humains et du droit humanitaire, du maintien des exportations d’armes à l’Arabie saoudite par le Canada. Nous déplorons de n’avoir reçu, à ce jour, aucune réponse de votre part ou des cabinets des ministres impliqués dans ce dossier.

Au cours de cette même année où le Canada a adhéré au TCA, ses exportations d’armes vers l’Arabie saoudite ont plus que doublé, passant de près de 1,3 milliard $ en 2018, à près de 2,9 milliards $ en 2019. Étonnamment, les exportations d’armes vers l’Arabie saoudite comptent maintenant pour plus de 75% des exportations de marchandises militaires du Canada, autres que celles destinées aux États-Unis.

Le Canada a annoncé son intention de publier, en 2020, un livre blanc pour une politique étrangère féministe, complétant ainsi sa politique d’aide internationale féministe existante ainsi que ses efforts envers l’égalité de genres et le programme Femmes, paix et sécurité (FPS). Le contrat de vente d’armes aux Saoudiens vient sérieusement miner ces efforts et s’avère totalement incompatible avec une politique étrangère féministe. Les femmes, ainsi que d’autres groupes vulnérables ou minoritaires, sont systématiquement opprimées en Arabie saoudite et sont affectées de façon disproportionnée par le conflit au Yémen. Le soutien direct au militarisme et à l’oppression par la fourniture d’armes est tout à fait à l’opposé d’une approche féministe en matière de politique étrangère.

De plus, les Principes directeurs relatifs aux entreprises et aux droits de l’homme, que le Canada a approuvés en 2011, indiquent clairement que les États devraient prendre les moyens nécessaires pour s’assurer que les politiques, lois, règlements et mesures exécutoires existantes permettent de prévenir les risques que des entreprises soient impliquées dans de graves violations des droits humains, et de prendre les actions nécessaires afin que les entreprises opérant dans des zones de conflits soient en mesure d’identifier, de prévenir et d’atténuer les risques aux droits humains de leurs activités et de leurs partenariats d’affaires. Ces Principes directeurs demandent aux États de porter une attention particulière au risque que des compagnies puissent contribuer à la violence de genre et à la violence sexuelle.

Nous sommes conscients que la fin des exportations d’armes canadiennes vers l’Arabie saoudite affectera les travailleurs de cette industrie. Nous demandons donc au gouvernement de travailler avec les syndicats qui les représentent afin de préparer un plan de soutien pour ceux et celles qui seront affectés par la suspension des exportations d’armes à l’Arabie saoudite.

Nous sommes déçus par ailleurs que votre gouvernement n’ait divulgué aucune information sur le panel d’experts indépendants, annoncé il y a plus de cinq mois par les ministres Champagne et Morneau. Malgré de multiples demandes pour contribuer à ce processus – qui pourrait aboutir à un meilleur respect du TCA – les organisations de la société civile ont été maintenues à l’écart de cette démarche. Nous sommes déçus aussi de n’entendre aucune information venant de ces ministres pour indiquer que le Canada mènera des discussions multilatérales afin de renforcer le respect du TCA et la mise en place d’un régime d’inspection internationale.

Monsieur le Premier ministre, la décision de reprendre les transferts d’armes en pleine pandémie de COVID-19, et quelques jours seulement après avoir soutenu l’appel du Secrétaire général des Nations Unies pour un cessez-le-feu mondial, vient miner l’engagement du Canada à l’égard du multilatéralisme et de la diplomatie. Nous réitérons notre appel pour que le Canada exerce son autorité souveraine et suspende le transfert de véhicules blindés légers et d’autres armes qui risquent d’être utilisées pour perpétrer de graves violations du droit humanitaire international ou du droit international relatif aux droits humains en Arabie saoudite ou dans le contexte du conflit au Yémen.

Sincèrement,

Alliance de la Fonction publique du Canada
Amnesty International Canada (English branch)
Amnistie internationale Canada francophone
BC Government and Service Employees’ Union (BCGEU)
Canadian Friends Service Committee (Quakers)
Canadian Voice of Women for Peace
Centre des femmes de Laval
Coalition pour la surveillance internationale des libertés civiles Collectif Échec à la guerre
Comité de Solidarité/Trois-Rivières
Congrès du travail du Canada
Fédération nationale des enseignantes et enseignants du Québec
Food4Humanity
International Civil Society Action Network
L’Institut Rideau
Labour Against the Arms Trade
Le Conseil Des Canadiens
Les Artistes pour la Paix
Les Canadiens pour la Justice et la Paix au Moyen-Orient
Libyan Women Forum
Ligue des droits et libertés
MADRE
Médecins du Monde Canada
Mouvement Québécois pour la Paix
Nobel Women’s Initiative
Oxfam Canada
Oxfam-Québec
Peace Track Initiative
People for Peace London
Project Ploughshares
SCFP Ontario
Sisters Trust Canada
Soeurs Auxiliatrices du Québec
Solidarité populaire Estrie – Groupe de défense collective des droits Syndicat canadien de la fonction publique
Syndicat des travailleurs et travailleuses des postes
Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom
Workers United Canada Council
World BEYOND War

c. c.:
Hon. François-Philippe Champagne, ministre des Affaires étrangères
Hon. Mary Ng, ministre de la Petite Entreprise, de la Promotion des exportations et du Commerce international
Hon. Chrystia Freeland, vice-première ministre et ministre des Finances Hon. Erin O’Toole, chef de l’Opposition officielle
Yves-François Blanchet, chef du Bloc québécois
Jagmeet Singh, chef du Nouveau Parti démocratique du Canada Elizabeth May, leader parlementaire du Parti vert du Canada
Michael Chong, critique en matière d’affaires étrangères au Parti conservateur du Canada Stéphane Bergeron, critique en matière d’affaires étrangères du Bloc Québécois
Jack Harris, critique en matière d’affaires étrangères du Nouveau Parti démocratique du Canada
Sai Rajagopal, critique en matière d’affaires étrangères du Parti vert du Canada

6 Comments

  1. Judy Kennedy says:

    Amen to the above.

  2. Thank you very much for these initiatives. Humanity is destined to LIVE IN PEACE!! It is inevitable. The planet will survive and return to different bounty and beauty!!
    … Praise be to God that thou hast attained!… Thou hast come to see a prisoner and an exile…. We desire but the good of the world and happiness of the nations; yet they deem us a stirrer up of strife and sedition worthy of bondage and banishment…. That all nations should become one in faith and all men as brothers; that the bonds of affection and unity between the sons of men should be strengthened; that diversity of religion should cease, and differences of race be annulled—what harm is there in this?… Yet so it shall be; these fruitless strifes, these ruinous wars shall pass away, and the “Most Great Peace” shall come…. Do not you in Europe need this also? Is not this that which Christ foretold?… Yet do we see your kings and rulers lavishing their treasures more freely on means for the destruction of the human race than on that which would conduce to the happiness of mankind…. These strifes and this bloodshed and discord must cease, and all men be as one kindred and one family…. Let not a man glory in this, that he loves his country; let him rather glory in this, that he loves his kind….

  3. Johnny Gagnon says:

    You cannot live on Earth and not be made into a pawn of the wealthy …. is that humanity?

  4. francis lavigne says:

    Again, I urge the Canadian gov’t. to stop sending armoured vehicles to Saudis who have been bombing & attacking Yemen (even to Drs. Without Borders’ hospitals, schools & civilian groups of people); all of that to Yemen, a country having a civil war & never having attacked any other country. Such is contrary to Geneva Conventions. Canada should have no part in this dreadful destruction, especially forcing refugees to live in appalling conditions in other countries.

  5. francis lavigne says:

    Were in, I urge Canadian gov’t to stop sending armoured jvehicles to Saudis who have been bombing & attacking Yemen (even to Drs. Without Borders hospitals, schools & civilian groups of people a country havng a civil war; all of that to Yemen which never attacked any other country. Such is contrary to Gemeva Conventions. Canada should have no part in such dreadful destruction especially forcing Yemeni refugees into deplore living conditions in other countries.

  6. Instead of assisting the Saudi war machine for use in the slaughter of innocent civilians in Yemen please uphold your promise of peace and help to put an end to the genocide in Yemen! Thank you!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search WorldBeyondWar.org

Translate To Any Language