Remembering Nagasaki: Welcoming the Nuclear Ban Treaty

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9 Aug 2017 - 18:00

Boston, MA

Remembering Nagasaki: Welcoming the Nuclear Ban Treaty

August 9 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

An Evening of Reflection, Celebration and Rededication

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 6:30 pm

First Church in Boston, 66 Marlborough Street

Refreshments will be provided

Seventy two years have passed since the United States dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) took effect 47 years ago, yet the five NPT nuclear weapons states have not taken serious action on their treaty commitments to nuclear disarmament. In the meantime, four more states have acquired nuclear weapons and the risks of their use have only increased over time.

To fill this legal and moral gap, the vast majority of non-nuclear states, under the auspices of the United Nations, adopted a new Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons on July 7. The nine nuclear-armed states and their close allies boycotted the talks; it’s now up to us to convince them to comply with the ban treaty and eliminate nuclear weapons once and for all.

John Loretz will report on the campaign that led up to the Nuclear Ban Treaty and the upcoming plans to advance nuclear disarmament. John is Program Director of International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War and serves on the steering group of ICAN – the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

Ashley Squires – a Masters student in Peace aand Conflict studies at UMass Lowell and a Mass. Peace Action intern – attended the Ban Treaty Conference and will give her impressions on the conference and on the prospects for improved US/Russia relations and disarmament.

Angela Kim – a senior at Wellesley College and a Mass. Peace Action intern – will speak on the North Korean nuclear issue and on the impact of the 1945 nuclear bombs on Korean conscripted laborers who were working in Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the time.
 

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