Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week

20 Feb 2018 - 20:14

Burlington, VT

Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week

Join the Peace & Justice Center (PJC) and Dr. John Reuwer (Physicians for Social Responsibility) for a Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week from February 20th to 25th. Each film is being hosted by a different partnering group. All are free, open to the public, and will include a facilitated Q&A led by Dr. John Reuwer following each film.

Twenty seven years removed from the end of the Cold War, over 14,000 working nuclear warheads still remain around the world today, in the possession of nine nations. The US and Russia still account for over 90% of this total, with those remaining being split between the UK, France, China, India, Pakistan, Israel, and perhaps most infamously, North Korea. Even as the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons wins a Nobel Peace Prize in 2017 for their tireless work, conflict continues to become increasingly more possible between two nuclear states, Kim Jong-Un’s North Korea and the US under the Trump administration. The issue of nuclear war is now more relevant than ever with the Doomsday Clock at two minutes to midnight.

On Tuesday, Feb 20, 6-8 pm, Threads will shown at UVM in the Williams Family Room on the 4th Floor of the Davis Center in Burlington. Threads (1984), a TV movie produced in the UK about how a small northern English town deals with nuclear fallout between the United States and the USSR, is a realistic view of nuclear winter and long term consequences. This film is hosted by UVM’s Amnesty International Club with promotional support from UVM’s ISO Club.

On Wednesday, Feb 21, 6-8 pm, Good Thinking will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Good Thinking (2016), a documentary by Anthony Donovan, educates viewers on the history and dangers of nuclear weapons and waste and documents decades of antinuclear efforts. A 90 minute section of this film will be screened. This film is hosted by the Burlington Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

On Thursday, Feb 22, 7-9 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Saint Michael’s College, Colchester. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increase over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This film is hosted by the Peace and Justice Club at Saint Michael’s College.

On Friday, Feb 23, 6-8 pm, Amazing Grace and Chuck will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Amazing Grace and Chuck (1987) is a story about a young American boy, Chuck, who protests nuclear weapons by giving up his favorite pastime (baseball). The story gets picked up by a local newspaper, and a professional basketball player “Amazing Grace” Smith joins him in his protest. This film is being hosted by members of the PJC Programming Team.

On Saturday, Feb 24, 6-8 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Champlain College. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increased over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This sfilm is hosted by PAUSE and Champlain Film Society at Champlain College with promotional support from Rights and Democracy (RAD).

On Sunday, Feb 25, 2-4 pm, The Man Who Saved the World will be shown at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College St., Burlington. The Man Who Saved the World (2012) is a one hour documentary about a Russian sub commander who refused to use nuclear torpedoes against the US Navy when protocol called for it. This film is being hosted by the Burlington Friends Meeting and the Burlington Branch of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

Dr. John Reuwer has begun studying and speaking about the medical effects of nuclear weapons since 1980, when Ronald Reagan was talking about winning a nuclear war with the Soviet Union. At that time, physicians and scientists had a major impact convincing Reagan and the American public to support nuclear disarmament. Weapons’ levels decreased dramatically over the next 30 years, before a recent resurgence and plans for a new nuclear arms race at a ridiculous cost to humanity. Dr. Reuwer currently serves on the Security Committee of Physicians for Social Responsibility and teaches conflict resolution at St. Michael College.

Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week

Join the Peace & Justice Center (PJC) and Dr. John Reuwer (Physicians for Social Responsibility) for a Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week from February 20th to 25th. Each film is being hosted by a different partnering group. All are free, open to the public, and will include a facilitated Q&A led by Dr. John Reuwer following each film.

Twenty seven years removed from the end of the Cold War, over 14,000 working nuclear warheads still remain around the world today, in the possession of nine nations. The US and Russia still account for over 90% of this total, with those remaining being split between the UK, France, China, India, Pakistan, Israel, and perhaps most infamously, North Korea. Even as the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons wins a Nobel Peace Prize in 2017 for their tireless work, conflict continues to become increasingly more possible between two nuclear states, Kim Jong-Un’s North Korea and the US under the Trump administration. The issue of nuclear war is now more relevant than ever with the Doomsday Clock at two minutes to midnight.

On Tuesday, Feb 20, 6-8 pm, Threads will shown at UVM in the Williams Family Room on the 4th Floor of the Davis Center in Burlington. Threads (1984), a TV movie produced in the UK about how a small northern English town deals with nuclear fallout between the United States and the USSR, is a realistic view of nuclear winter and long term consequences. This film is hosted by UVM’s Amnesty International Club with promotional support from UVM’s ISO Club.

On Wednesday, Feb 21, 6-8 pm, Good Thinking will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Good Thinking (2016), a documentary by Anthony Donovan, educates viewers on the history and dangers of nuclear weapons and waste and documents decades of antinuclear efforts. A 90 minute section of this film will be screened. This film is hosted by the Burlington Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

On Thursday, Feb 22, 7-9 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Saint Michael’s College, Colchester. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increase over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This film is hosted by the Peace and Justice Club at Saint Michael’s College.

On Friday, Feb 23, 6-8 pm, Amazing Grace and Chuck will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Amazing Grace and Chuck (1987) is a story about a young American boy, Chuck, who protests nuclear weapons by giving up his favorite pastime (baseball). The story gets picked up by a local newspaper, and a professional basketball player “Amazing Grace” Smith joins him in his protest. This film is being hosted by members of the PJC Programming Team.

On Saturday, Feb 24, 6-8 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Champlain College. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increased over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This sfilm is hosted by PAUSE and Champlain Film Society at Champlain College with promotional support from Rights and Democracy (RAD).

On Sunday, Feb 25, 2-4 pm, The Man Who Saved the World will be shown at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College St., Burlington. The Man Who Saved the World (2012) is a one hour documentary about a Russian sub commander who refused to use nuclear torpedoes against the US Navy when protocol called for it. This film is being hosted by the Burlington Friends Meeting and the Burlington Branch of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

Dr. John Reuwer has begun studying and speaking about the medical effects of nuclear weapons since 1980, when Ronald Reagan was talking about winning a nuclear war with the Soviet Union. At that time, physicians and scientists had a major impact convincing Reagan and the American public to support nuclear disarmament. Weapons’ levels decreased dramatically over the next 30 years, before a recent resurgence and plans for a new nuclear arms race at a ridiculous cost to humanity. Dr. Reuwer currently serves on the Security Committee of Physicians for Social Responsibility and teaches conflict resolution at St. Michael College.

Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week

Join the Peace & Justice Center (PJC) and Dr. John Reuwer (Physicians for Social Responsibility) for a Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week from February 20th to 25th. Each film is being hosted by a different partnering group. All are free, open to the public, and will include a facilitated Q&A led by Dr. John Reuwer following each film.

Twenty seven years removed from the end of the Cold War, over 14,000 working nuclear warheads still remain around the world today, in the possession of nine nations. The US and Russia still account for over 90% of this total, with those remaining being split between the UK, France, China, India, Pakistan, Israel, and perhaps most infamously, North Korea. Even as the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons wins a Nobel Peace Prize in 2017 for their tireless work, conflict continues to become increasingly more possible between two nuclear states, Kim Jong-Un’s North Korea and the US under the Trump administration. The issue of nuclear war is now more relevant than ever with the Doomsday Clock at two minutes to midnight.

On Tuesday, Feb 20, 6-8 pm, Threads will shown at UVM in the Williams Family Room on the 4th Floor of the Davis Center in Burlington. Threads (1984), a TV movie produced in the UK about how a small northern English town deals with nuclear fallout between the United States and the USSR, is a realistic view of nuclear winter and long term consequences. This film is hosted by UVM’s Amnesty International Club with promotional support from UVM’s ISO Club.

On Wednesday, Feb 21, 6-8 pm, Good Thinking will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Good Thinking (2016), a documentary by Anthony Donovan, educates viewers on the history and dangers of nuclear weapons and waste and documents decades of antinuclear efforts. A 90 minute section of this film will be screened. This film is hosted by the Burlington Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

On Thursday, Feb 22, 7-9 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Saint Michael’s College, Colchester. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increase over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This film is hosted by the Peace and Justice Club at Saint Michael’s College.

On Friday, Feb 23, 6-8 pm, Amazing Grace and Chuck will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Amazing Grace and Chuck (1987) is a story about a young American boy, Chuck, who protests nuclear weapons by giving up his favorite pastime (baseball). The story gets picked up by a local newspaper, and a professional basketball player “Amazing Grace” Smith joins him in his protest. This film is being hosted by members of the PJC Programming Team.

On Saturday, Feb 24, 6-8 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Champlain College. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increased over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This sfilm is hosted by PAUSE and Champlain Film Society at Champlain College with promotional support from Rights and Democracy (RAD).

On Sunday, Feb 25, 2-4 pm, The Man Who Saved the World will be shown at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College St., Burlington. The Man Who Saved the World (2012) is a one hour documentary about a Russian sub commander who refused to use nuclear torpedoes against the US Navy when protocol called for it. This film is being hosted by the Burlington Friends Meeting and the Burlington Branch of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

Dr. John Reuwer has begun studying and speaking about the medical effects of nuclear weapons since 1980, when Ronald Reagan was talking about winning a nuclear war with the Soviet Union. At that time, physicians and scientists had a major impact convincing Reagan and the American public to support nuclear disarmament. Weapons’ levels decreased dramatically over the next 30 years, before a recent resurgence and plans for a new nuclear arms race at a ridiculous cost to humanity. Dr. Reuwer currently serves on the Security Committee of Physicians for Social Responsibility and teaches conflict resolution at St. Michael College.

Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week

Join the Peace & Justice Center (PJC) and Dr. John Reuwer (Physicians for Social Responsibility) for a Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week from February 20th to 25th. Each film is being hosted by a different partnering group. All are free, open to the public, and will include a facilitated Q&A led by Dr. John Reuwer following each film.

Twenty seven years removed from the end of the Cold War, over 14,000 working nuclear warheads still remain around the world today, in the possession of nine nations. The US and Russia still account for over 90% of this total, with those remaining being split between the UK, France, China, India, Pakistan, Israel, and perhaps most infamously, North Korea. Even as the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons wins a Nobel Peace Prize in 2017 for their tireless work, conflict continues to become increasingly more possible between two nuclear states, Kim Jong-Un’s North Korea and the US under the Trump administration. The issue of nuclear war is now more relevant than ever with the Doomsday Clock at two minutes to midnight.

On Tuesday, Feb 20, 6-8 pm, Threads will shown at UVM in the Williams Family Room on the 4th Floor of the Davis Center in Burlington. Threads (1984), a TV movie produced in the UK about how a small northern English town deals with nuclear fallout between the United States and the USSR, is a realistic view of nuclear winter and long term consequences. This film is hosted by UVM’s Amnesty International Club with promotional support from UVM’s ISO Club.

On Wednesday, Feb 21, 6-8 pm, Good Thinking will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Good Thinking (2016), a documentary by Anthony Donovan, educates viewers on the history and dangers of nuclear weapons and waste and documents decades of antinuclear efforts. A 90 minute section of this film will be screened. This film is hosted by the Burlington Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

On Thursday, Feb 22, 7-9 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Saint Michael’s College, Colchester. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increase over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This film is hosted by the Peace and Justice Club at Saint Michael’s College.

On Friday, Feb 23, 6-8 pm, Amazing Grace and Chuck will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Amazing Grace and Chuck (1987) is a story about a young American boy, Chuck, who protests nuclear weapons by giving up his favorite pastime (baseball). The story gets picked up by a local newspaper, and a professional basketball player “Amazing Grace” Smith joins him in his protest. This film is being hosted by members of the PJC Programming Team.

On Saturday, Feb 24, 6-8 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Champlain College. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increased over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This sfilm is hosted by PAUSE and Champlain Film Society at Champlain College with promotional support from Rights and Democracy (RAD).

On Sunday, Feb 25, 2-4 pm, The Man Who Saved the World will be shown at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College St., Burlington. The Man Who Saved the World (2012) is a one hour documentary about a Russian sub commander who refused to use nuclear torpedoes against the US Navy when protocol called for it. This film is being hosted by the Burlington Friends Meeting and the Burlington Branch of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

Dr. John Reuwer has begun studying and speaking about the medical effects of nuclear weapons since 1980, when Ronald Reagan was talking about winning a nuclear war with the Soviet Union. At that time, physicians and scientists had a major impact convincing Reagan and the American public to support nuclear disarmament. Weapons’ levels decreased dramatically over the next 30 years, before a recent resurgence and plans for a new nuclear arms race at a ridiculous cost to humanity. Dr. Reuwer currently serves on the Security Committee of Physicians for Social Responsibility and teaches conflict resolution at St. Michael College.

Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week

Join the Peace & Justice Center (PJC) and Dr. John Reuwer (Physicians for Social Responsibility) for a Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week from February 20th to 25th. Each film is being hosted by a different partnering group. All are free, open to the public, and will include a facilitated Q&A led by Dr. John Reuwer following each film.

Twenty seven years removed from the end of the Cold War, over 14,000 working nuclear warheads still remain around the world today, in the possession of nine nations. The US and Russia still account for over 90% of this total, with those remaining being split between the UK, France, China, India, Pakistan, Israel, and perhaps most infamously, North Korea. Even as the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons wins a Nobel Peace Prize in 2017 for their tireless work, conflict continues to become increasingly more possible between two nuclear states, Kim Jong-Un’s North Korea and the US under the Trump administration. The issue of nuclear war is now more relevant than ever with the Doomsday Clock at two minutes to midnight.

On Tuesday, Feb 20, 6-8 pm, Threads will shown at UVM in the Williams Family Room on the 4th Floor of the Davis Center in Burlington. Threads (1984), a TV movie produced in the UK about how a small northern English town deals with nuclear fallout between the United States and the USSR, is a realistic view of nuclear winter and long term consequences. This film is hosted by UVM’s Amnesty International Club with promotional support from UVM’s ISO Club.

On Wednesday, Feb 21, 6-8 pm, Good Thinking will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Good Thinking (2016), a documentary by Anthony Donovan, educates viewers on the history and dangers of nuclear weapons and waste and documents decades of antinuclear efforts. A 90 minute section of this film will be screened. This film is hosted by the Burlington Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

On Thursday, Feb 22, 7-9 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Saint Michael’s College, Colchester. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increase over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This film is hosted by the Peace and Justice Club at Saint Michael’s College.

On Friday, Feb 23, 6-8 pm, Amazing Grace and Chuck will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Amazing Grace and Chuck (1987) is a story about a young American boy, Chuck, who protests nuclear weapons by giving up his favorite pastime (baseball). The story gets picked up by a local newspaper, and a professional basketball player “Amazing Grace” Smith joins him in his protest. This film is being hosted by members of the PJC Programming Team.

On Saturday, Feb 24, 6-8 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Champlain College. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increased over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This sfilm is hosted by PAUSE and Champlain Film Society at Champlain College with promotional support from Rights and Democracy (RAD).

On Sunday, Feb 25, 2-4 pm, The Man Who Saved the World will be shown at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College St., Burlington. The Man Who Saved the World (2012) is a one hour documentary about a Russian sub commander who refused to use nuclear torpedoes against the US Navy when protocol called for it. This film is being hosted by the Burlington Friends Meeting and the Burlington Branch of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

Dr. John Reuwer has begun studying and speaking about the medical effects of nuclear weapons since 1980, when Ronald Reagan was talking about winning a nuclear war with the Soviet Union. At that time, physicians and scientists had a major impact convincing Reagan and the American public to support nuclear disarmament. Weapons’ levels decreased dramatically over the next 30 years, before a recent resurgence and plans for a new nuclear arms race at a ridiculous cost to humanity. Dr. Reuwer currently serves on the Security Committee of Physicians for Social Responsibility and teaches conflict resolution at St. Michael College.

Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week

Join the Peace & Justice Center (PJC) and Dr. John Reuwer (Physicians for Social Responsibility) for a Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week from February 20th to 25th. Each film is being hosted by a different partnering group. All are free, open to the public, and will include a facilitated Q&A led by Dr. John Reuwer following each film.

Twenty seven years removed from the end of the Cold War, over 14,000 working nuclear warheads still remain around the world today, in the possession of nine nations. The US and Russia still account for over 90% of this total, with those remaining being split between the UK, France, China, India, Pakistan, Israel, and perhaps most infamously, North Korea. Even as the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons wins a Nobel Peace Prize in 2017 for their tireless work, conflict continues to become increasingly more possible between two nuclear states, Kim Jong-Un’s North Korea and the US under the Trump administration. The issue of nuclear war is now more relevant than ever with the Doomsday Clock at two minutes to midnight.

On Tuesday, Feb 20, 6-8 pm, Threads will shown at UVM in the Williams Family Room on the 4th Floor of the Davis Center in Burlington. Threads (1984), a TV movie produced in the UK about how a small northern English town deals with nuclear fallout between the United States and the USSR, is a realistic view of nuclear winter and long term consequences. This film is hosted by UVM’s Amnesty International Club with promotional support from UVM’s ISO Club.

On Wednesday, Feb 21, 6-8 pm, Good Thinking will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Good Thinking (2016), a documentary by Anthony Donovan, educates viewers on the history and dangers of nuclear weapons and waste and documents decades of antinuclear efforts. A 90 minute section of this film will be screened. This film is hosted by the Burlington Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

On Thursday, Feb 22, 7-9 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Saint Michael’s College, Colchester. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increase over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This film is hosted by the Peace and Justice Club at Saint Michael’s College.

On Friday, Feb 23, 6-8 pm, Amazing Grace and Chuck will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Amazing Grace and Chuck (1987) is a story about a young American boy, Chuck, who protests nuclear weapons by giving up his favorite pastime (baseball). The story gets picked up by a local newspaper, and a professional basketball player “Amazing Grace” Smith joins him in his protest. This film is being hosted by members of the PJC Programming Team.

On Saturday, Feb 24, 6-8 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Champlain College. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increased over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This sfilm is hosted by PAUSE and Champlain Film Society at Champlain College with promotional support from Rights and Democracy (RAD).

On Sunday, Feb 25, 2-4 pm, The Man Who Saved the World will be shown at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College St., Burlington. The Man Who Saved the World (2012) is a one hour documentary about a Russian sub commander who refused to use nuclear torpedoes against the US Navy when protocol called for it. This film is being hosted by the Burlington Friends Meeting and the Burlington Branch of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

Dr. John Reuwer has begun studying and speaking about the medical effects of nuclear weapons since 1980, when Ronald Reagan was talking about winning a nuclear war with the Soviet Union. At that time, physicians and scientists had a major impact convincing Reagan and the American public to support nuclear disarmament. Weapons’ levels decreased dramatically over the next 30 years, before a recent resurgence and plans for a new nuclear arms race at a ridiculous cost to humanity. Dr. Reuwer currently serves on the Security Committee of Physicians for Social Responsibility and teaches conflict resolution at St. Michael College.

Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week

Join the Peace & Justice Center (PJC) and Dr. John Reuwer (Physicians for Social Responsibility) for a Nuclear War and Weapons Film Week from February 20th to 25th. Each film is being hosted by a different partnering group. All are free, open to the public, and will include a facilitated Q&A led by Dr. John Reuwer following each film.

Twenty seven years removed from the end of the Cold War, over 14,000 working nuclear warheads still remain around the world today, in the possession of nine nations. The US and Russia still account for over 90% of this total, with those remaining being split between the UK, France, China, India, Pakistan, Israel, and perhaps most infamously, North Korea. Even as the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons wins a Nobel Peace Prize in 2017 for their tireless work, conflict continues to become increasingly more possible between two nuclear states, Kim Jong-Un’s North Korea and the US under the Trump administration. The issue of nuclear war is now more relevant than ever with the Doomsday Clock at two minutes to midnight.

On Tuesday, Feb 20, 6-8 pm, Threads will shown at UVM in the Williams Family Room on the 4th Floor of the Davis Center in Burlington. Threads (1984), a TV movie produced in the UK about how a small northern English town deals with nuclear fallout between the United States and the USSR, is a realistic view of nuclear winter and long term consequences. This film is hosted by UVM’s Amnesty International Club with promotional support from UVM’s ISO Club.

On Wednesday, Feb 21, 6-8 pm, Good Thinking will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Good Thinking (2016), a documentary by Anthony Donovan, educates viewers on the history and dangers of nuclear weapons and waste and documents decades of antinuclear efforts. A 90 minute section of this film will be screened. This film is hosted by the Burlington Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

On Thursday, Feb 22, 7-9 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Saint Michael’s College, Colchester. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increase over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This film is hosted by the Peace and Justice Club at Saint Michael’s College.

On Friday, Feb 23, 6-8 pm, Amazing Grace and Chuck will be shown at the Peace & Justice Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Amazing Grace and Chuck (1987) is a story about a young American boy, Chuck, who protests nuclear weapons by giving up his favorite pastime (baseball). The story gets picked up by a local newspaper, and a professional basketball player “Amazing Grace” Smith joins him in his protest. This film is being hosted by members of the PJC Programming Team.

On Saturday, Feb 24, 6-8 pm, Countdown to Zero will be shown at Champlain College. Countdown to Zero (2010) is a documentary about how the risk of nuclear weapon (or fissile materials) usage has continued to increased over time, due to the rise of terrorism and lack of safeguards and accounting of fissile material and how the world can ultimately bring its number down to zero. This sfilm is hosted by PAUSE and Champlain Film Society at Champlain College with promotional support from Rights and Democracy (RAD).

On Sunday, Feb 25, 2-4 pm, The Man Who Saved the World will be shown at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College St., Burlington. The Man Who Saved the World (2012) is a one hour documentary about a Russian sub commander who refused to use nuclear torpedoes against the US Navy when protocol called for it. This film is being hosted by the Burlington Friends Meeting and the Burlington Branch of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

Dr. John Reuwer has begun studying and speaking about the medical effects of nuclear weapons since 1980, when Ronald Reagan was talking about winning a nuclear war with the Soviet Union. At that time, physicians and scientists had a major impact convincing Reagan and the American public to support nuclear disarmament. Weapons’ levels decreased dramatically over the next 30 years, before a recent resurgence and plans for a new nuclear arms race at a ridiculous cost to humanity. Dr. Reuwer currently serves on the Security Committee of Physicians for Social Responsibility and teaches conflict resolution at St. Michael College.

Translate »